ARO.OPS.230 Determination of disruptive schedules

 

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ORO.FC.A.201

In-flight relief of flight crew members

For the purpose of flight time limitations, the competent authority shall determine, in accordance with the definitions of “early type” and “late type” of disruptive schedules in point ORO.FTL.105 of Annex III, which of those two types of disruptive schedules shall apply to all CAT operators under its oversight.

Note: The Author has added the following information to let readers know what countries have publicly made information concerning this regulation as it applies to operations the local NAA jurisdiction. Where no information has been provided; the default most restrictive has been applied until public information has been released.

Country

Early/Late Type

Country

Early/Late Type

Country

Early/Late Type

Albania

Late

Germany

Early

Netherlands

Late

Austria

Early

Greece

Late

Norway

Early

Belgium

Late

Hungary

Early

Poland

Early

Bosnia-Herzegovina

Early

Iceland

Most Restrictive

Portugal

Most Restrictive

Bulgaria

Most Restrictive

Ireland

Early

Romania

Early

Croatia

Early

Italy

Early

Slovak

Late

Cyprus

Early

Latvia

Late

Slovenia

Early

Czech

Early

Liechtenstein

Early

Spain

Late

Denmark

Early

Lithuania

Early

Sweden

Early

Estonia

Early

Luxembourg

Late

Switzerland

Early

Finland

Early

Malta

Early

Turkey

Late

France

Late

Montenegro

Early

UK

Late

Type

Late Finish

Early Start

Late

00:00 – 1:59

05:00 – 06:59

Early

23:00 – 1:59

05:00 – 05:59

Most Restrictive

23:00 – 1:59

05:00 – 06:59

 Extract form EASA meeting from 27-May-2015:

ARO.OPS.230

One Member State (MS) asked which rules should apply when an AOC holder had operating bases in different MS of different ’types’ (early type or late type).

EASA answered that the crew members of all AOC holders operating in a certain MS would have to adapt their life style to the type of disruptive schedule adopted by the State of Oversight.

Another MS asked which ‘type’ should apply if a group of AOC holders wanted to swap crews between states of different ’types’.

EASA explained that a combination of the more restrictive ‘windows’ from both ‘types’ should be applied. The reason is that crew members cannot adapt their cultural chrono-type every time they changed from one AOC to another in the same group. This principle was supported by all MS present.

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